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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
ENTERPRISE PERFORMANCE LIFE CYCLE FRAMEWORK
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<OPDIV Logo>
PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLAN
Issue Date: <mm/dd/yyyy>
Revision Date: <mm/dd/yyyy>
<OPDIV> Project Management Plan (v1.0) a P ge 1 of 3
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Document Purpose
This Practices Guides is a brief document that provides an overview describing the best practices,
activities, attributes, and related templates, tools, information, and key terminology of industry-leading
project management practices and their accompanying project management templates.
Background
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Enterprise Performance Life Cycle (EPLC) is a
framework to enhance Information Technology (IT) governance through rigorous application of sound
investment and project management principles, and industry best practices. The EPLC provides the
context for the governance process and describes interdependencies between its project management,
investment management, and capital planning components. The EPLC framework establishes an
environment in which HHS IT investments and projects consistently achieve successful outcomes that
align with Department and Operating Division goals and objectives.
Project Management Institute (PMI) A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK)
defines a project management plan (PMP) as a formal approved document that defines the overall plan
for how the project will be executed, monitored and controlled.
The PMP may be a single detailed document or composed of one or more subsidiary planning
documents. These additional planning documents provide guidance and direction for specific
management, planning, and control activities such as schedule, cost, risk, staffing, change control,
communications, quality, procurement, deployment, etc. Each of the subsidiary planning documents
should be detailed to the extent required by the specific project.
Practice Overview
A PMP is essential for defining how project integration management will be executed when situations
arise where individual processes interact. For example, estimating cost involves not only the cost
management process but also integration of planning, time, risk, scope etc.
The PMBOK defines project integration management as the processes and activities needed to identify,
define, combine, unify, and coordinate the various processes and project management activities.
In the context of project management, integration includes characteristics of unification and consolidation
actions necessary for project completion. Project integration management also involves making trade-offs
among competing objectives and alternatives. Integration, in the context of managing a project, is making
choices about where to concentrate resources and effort on any given day, anticipating potential issues,
dealing with these issues before they become critical, and coordinating work. A properly developed PMP
outlines how these activities will be conducted, taking into consideration any effect they may have on
each other and other management processes and/or activities. As the project environment changes,
updates in the form of change requests should reflect any changes to the PMP and/or its subsidiary
plans.
Benefits of creating a PMP include:
Clearly defined roles, responsibilities, processes, and activities
Increased probability that projects will complete on-time, within budget, and with high degree of
quality
Ensuring understanding of what was agreed upon
Helping project teams identify and plan for how project activities will be managed (scope,
cost/budget, quality, etc.)
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