Morse Code Alphabet Chart



Save, fill-In The Blanks, Print, Done!

Click on image to zoom / Click button below to see more images


Microsoft Word (.docx)

Or select the format you want and we convert it for you for free:



  • This Document Has Been Certified by a Professional
  • 100% customizable
  • This is a digital download (65.73 kB)
  • Language: English
  • We recommend downloading this file onto your computer.


  
ABT template rating: 8

Malware- and virusfree. Scanned by: Norton safe website

Are you curious about how the Morse Code Alphabet works and you want to learn more about it? Download now this free professional Morse Code Alphabet Chart!

Morse is a code of communication consisting of intermittent broadcast signals, which represent letters, punctuation, and numbers. The code was invented in 1835 by Samuel Morse and developed with the aim to use them for the telegraph. Since with the telegraph you are limited to two options: key down (= current) or key not pressed (= no power) and duration (short or long). Telegraphy is widely regarded as a forerunner of later digital communication.
Morse code was invented to create and interpret messages over electric devices, such as light bulbs, switches, power supply, 3 connecting leads, etc. 

They are designed according to the following set of rules:

  • a dash lasts as long as three dots only;
  • space as long as one dot is left between each pulse;
  • space as long as one dash is left between each letter of a word;
  • space as long as 5 dots is left between each word of a sentence.
This Morse Code Alphabet Template explains the Morse code and also explains the Alphabet from A to Z, number 0 to 9, and actions: 'full stop', 'comma', and 'query'.

Try out our free educational templates to print at home templates and forms today.




DISCLAIMER
Nothing on this site shall be considered legal advice and no attorney-client relationship is established.


Leave a Reply. If you have any questions or remarks, feel free to post them below.


default user img

If you would like to know the value of money, try to borrow some. | Benjamin Franklin